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Jakeprice.com Blog

Collected Hurricane Harvey Updates

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August 29, 2017

Sitting here at #JFK about to board a plane and head into another once in a 500 year storm—the third one in as many years, many thoughts are running through my mind. Much of my life the past 15 years has been dedicated to witnessing the changes wrought by the #anthropocene from Hurricanes #Sandy#Katrinaand #Rita and the great #Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011. But this time it feels a little different. I’m older now and my friends have begun having families and I have been so lucky to have these wonderful new people come into my life—and my niece and nephew are are just entering into their adolescence and young adult years. I now share a birthday with a beautiful little boy who began his life in displaced housing in Tohoku and not a day goes by when I haven’t thought about the people I met and now consider family in Northern #Japan.

Thinking about what I will see in Houston and all along the #GulfCoast, I am sure to see many of the same scenes that I’ve seen before: the flooded homes, the slow moving recovery, the tremendous hearts of people coming together and making their way through this immensely challenging time.

However, I am filming and photographing with an increased urgency thinking about the young lives that I’ve come to know over the past 15 years—lives that have been born into this increasingly volatile environment of our own making. To that end, the postings I will be making in the coming days will be an urgent plea for us to make changes in our lives and IMMEDIATELY advocate for cleaner and less polluting energy—the cause for these more intense storms. We must leave these children a better legacy than what we currently are doing.

For the cities, states and corporations that have remained committed to the #parisaccords (#parisagreement) we need to examine how to speed up our commitment and invest in these new and, in light of the millions impacted in Houston, life saving technologies. They are there, well within reach and so MUST be implemented without delay. We MUST actively push for these technologies—DEMAND that we have them, otherwise simply nothing will happen or it will happen much too late. Climate change is no less urgent than any invasion or war and we must make decisions with equal haste.

A second goal of mine on this trip is also to reach out to the red state of #Texasand see if we can begin to bridge some of the divide that separates this country. Being a lifelong #NewYorker, it might sound strange for me to say that every time I’ve been to Texas I’ve always come away with admiration for the people I met there. (The politicians are another matter.) So, to those of you in the state who are reading this I come with the desire reach out and that my small contribution through photographs and filmmaking can help bring us together and make this county and world a better place.

 August 30, 2017From today's everyday climate change post: On the 12 year anniversary of  #hurricane   #katrina  I find myself back in the  #gulfofmexico  and seeing the  #aftermath  of hurricane  #harvey  in a city transformed beyond anything it has ever known. Much of it has become an extension of the gulf following the storm. Search and rescue teams are still saving people who are stranded in abandoned homes-on my boat we must have taken out no less than 20 people and a stranded cat. As a nearby levy is teetering on the brink of overflowing the concern is palpable here-the waters rose about 6 inches while I was in the boat. On the positive side of things the spirit here is amazing and the dedication of the rescuers so admirable. It's going to take a long time to recover and the first thing to bring that about is keeping people's spirits up because there is a tremendously long road ahead.  #texas   #climatechange  #climatechangeisreal

August 30, 2017From today's everyday climate change post: On the 12 year anniversary of #hurricane #katrina I find myself back in the #gulfofmexico and seeing the #aftermath of hurricane #harvey in a city transformed beyond anything it has ever known. Much of it has become an extension of the gulf following the storm. Search and rescue teams are still saving people who are stranded in abandoned homes-on my boat we must have taken out no less than 20 people and a stranded cat. As a nearby levy is teetering on the brink of overflowing the concern is palpable here-the waters rose about 6 inches while I was in the boat. On the positive side of things the spirit here is amazing and the dedication of the rescuers so admirable. It's going to take a long time to recover and the first thing to bring that about is keeping people's spirits up because there is a tremendously long road ahead. #texas #climatechange#climatechangeisreal

 August 30, 2017 Wrapping it up for the day here...but before I go, one photo and some thoughts: before leaving Austin this morning I had breakfast at the motel full of  #RedCross  volunteers, mostly, I estimate, in their 50s and over. Many were speaking Spanish as well as English. They were diligently preparing beds for the influx of displaced people coming in from Houston. Once I arrived in Houston I went straight to one of the evacuation zones as the nearby levy threatened to overflow and joined a rescue mission. As the boat made its way through the neighborhood I'd come across many more languages and skin tones, nationalities and faiths. Everyone that I encountered were working against tremendous odds to help others—each person was driven by a deep concern for the person next to them. Whether they were in the water or on it, the concern was to look out for another person's well being. I don't know, nor do I care about a person's supposed legal status—here there was great humanity and that was the true language of the day. That's all that counts. THIS IS WHAT  #MAKESAMERICAGREAT    #texas ,  #houston ,  #harvey ,  #hurricaneharvey ,  #makeamericagreat ,  #climatechange ,  #climatechangeisreal

August 30, 2017 Wrapping it up for the day here...but before I go, one photo and some thoughts: before leaving Austin this morning I had breakfast at the motel full of #RedCross volunteers, mostly, I estimate, in their 50s and over. Many were speaking Spanish as well as English. They were diligently preparing beds for the influx of displaced people coming in from Houston. Once I arrived in Houston I went straight to one of the evacuation zones as the nearby levy threatened to overflow and joined a rescue mission. As the boat made its way through the neighborhood I'd come across many more languages and skin tones, nationalities and faiths. Everyone that I encountered were working against tremendous odds to help others—each person was driven by a deep concern for the person next to them. Whether they were in the water or on it, the concern was to look out for another person's well being. I don't know, nor do I care about a person's supposed legal status—here there was great humanity and that was the true language of the day. That's all that counts. THIS IS WHAT #MAKESAMERICAGREAT

#texas#houston#harvey#hurricaneharvey#makeamericagreat#climatechange#climatechangeisreal

 August 31, 2017 Update from Houston & today's everyday climate change post:@jakepricenyc for @everydayclimatechange The spotter on the boat quickly asked the pilot to cut the engine—"I thought I heard a woman's voice," he said. All went quiet and there was just the lapping of the wake alongside our boat. From down the street we heard a woman's voice. She sounded old to me, but not seeing her there was no telling....But we definitely heard a human voice. The men in the boat started to shot in her direction, asking for her address—we navigated by entering in people's addresses into a map application. She responded. I couldn't make out what she was saying, but at least we had an idea of which direction she was calling from.The pilot powered on the boat and began moving in the direction of the voice which started to become clearer. A door slightly opened on one of the waterlogged homes and we moved in her direction. Chimes were blowing in front of her home, I remember them swaying in the breeze. When we drifted over to her flooded doorstep she said, "Can you give me 10 minutes?" Her name was Carmen and she and the man she was living with were organizing the last of their things, taking what little they could from a life built comfortably in this home along Houston's energy corridor. She did not know where she would go or when she would return—this section of the city will be underwater for at least the next month as a nearby levy is drained. ———— In all,  #HurricaneHarvey  has displaced thousands and has directly affected 1 in 2 Texans. It will cost billions to repair and many lives will not be able to be repaired. 30% of  #Houston  is or was under water caused by the storm.  #Climatechange here plays a role, too: While this storm would have happened without our interference, it was strengthened and made stronger because the ocean is warmer. Warmer oceans provide energy which fuels the formation and rapid intensification of tropical storms. Because warmer air holds more water vapor, the vapor results in more waterfall and with sea levels higher the storm surge is all the more powerful.   #Texas , #Houston,  #Climatechangeisreal

August 31, 2017 Update from Houston & today's everyday climate change post:@jakepricenyc for @everydayclimatechange The spotter on the boat quickly asked the pilot to cut the engine—"I thought I heard a woman's voice," he said. All went quiet and there was just the lapping of the wake alongside our boat. From down the street we heard a woman's voice. She sounded old to me, but not seeing her there was no telling....But we definitely heard a human voice. The men in the boat started to shot in her direction, asking for her address—we navigated by entering in people's addresses into a map application. She responded. I couldn't make out what she was saying, but at least we had an idea of which direction she was calling from.The pilot powered on the boat and began moving in the direction of the voice which started to become clearer. A door slightly opened on one of the waterlogged homes and we moved in her direction. Chimes were blowing in front of her home, I remember them swaying in the breeze. When we drifted over to her flooded doorstep she said, "Can you give me 10 minutes?" Her name was Carmen and she and the man she was living with were organizing the last of their things, taking what little they could from a life built comfortably in this home along Houston's energy corridor. She did not know where she would go or when she would return—this section of the city will be underwater for at least the next month as a nearby levy is drained. ———— In all, #HurricaneHarvey has displaced thousands and has directly affected 1 in 2 Texans. It will cost billions to repair and many lives will not be able to be repaired. 30% of #Houston is or was under water caused by the storm. #Climatechangehere plays a role, too: While this storm would have happened without our interference, it was strengthened and made stronger because the ocean is warmer. Warmer oceans provide energy which fuels the formation and rapid intensification of tropical storms. Because warmer air holds more water vapor, the vapor results in more waterfall and with sea levels higher the storm surge is all the more powerful.

#Texas, #Houston, #Climatechangeisreal

 Saptember 1, 2017 This is Amber. She evacuated to the  #houstonconvention  center after water rapidly rose in her home. As she fled the water she was mugged while seeking refuge, losing what little she had. She wasn't bitter about it, but said she had to keep going, thankful to be alive. The little boy she's holding is Joshua, 3 months old today. Joshua is not her child but the boy of a woman whom she made friends with in the shelter. Wanting to give Joshua's mom a rest, Amber took the child into her own arms, in 102f degree(39C) heat. Such generosity is not uncommon to what I've witnessed the past 3 days, but is tremendously special.   #harvey ,  #hurricaneharvey ,  #hurricane ,  #houston ,  #texas , #climatechange ,  #climatechangeisreal ,  #healing

Saptember 1, 2017 This is Amber. She evacuated to the #houstonconvention center after water rapidly rose in her home. As she fled the water she was mugged while seeking refuge, losing what little she had. She wasn't bitter about it, but said she had to keep going, thankful to be alive. The little boy she's holding is Joshua, 3 months old today. Joshua is not her child but the boy of a woman whom she made friends with in the shelter. Wanting to give Joshua's mom a rest, Amber took the child into her own arms, in 102f degree(39C) heat. Such generosity is not uncommon to what I've witnessed the past 3 days, but is tremendously special.

#harvey#hurricaneharvey#hurricane#houston#texas,#climatechange#climatechangeisreal#healing

 September 2, 2017   From today's @everydayclimatechange post: In the aftermath of  #HurricaneHarvey  chemical plants all throughout storm battered  #Texas have released more than two million pounds of dangerous chemicals into the air this week. The most dramatic release of pollutants stemmed from the the fires started by liquid organic peroxides in Crosby. A mile and a half exclusion zone was formed around the plant, however Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said that the smoke there was nothing more than what might be found from a campfire—I don't know about you, but I've never known of a campfire that needed to have a a mile and a half exclusion zone around it. (15 of his deputies were also hospitalized for being around this "campfire.")   Pictured here is the Chevron Phillips plant that has sent more than 766,000 pounds of chemicals to flare after the facility shut down following #hurricaneharvey. The plant was closed in anticipation of severe flooding. However, when the plant started up again it released massive amounts pollutants into the air including CO2, thus producing a vicious cycle when it comes to  #climatechange : more CO2 in the atmosphere means warmer oceans which mean more powerful and drenching storms like  #Harvey  which then force plants like this one to shut down and then reopen.  This all strikes me as another reason why the energy that the US depends on MUST make a rapid transition to renewables. This is achievable if we made the effort and demand that the power we consume come from nonpolluting sources. The current administration under the 45th president has tried to block investment in clean energy. Indeed, the EPA whose responsibility it is to measure the impact from such disasters such as Harvey is being destroyed from within by the current president and his appointees as funding for the agency is being slashed. Presently, there is no director for the agency's Texas district.   #climatechangeisreal

September 2, 2017 

From today's @everydayclimatechange post: In the aftermath of #HurricaneHarvey chemical plants all throughout storm battered #Texashave released more than two million pounds of dangerous chemicals into the air this week. The most dramatic release of pollutants stemmed from the the fires started by liquid organic peroxides in Crosby. A mile and a half exclusion zone was formed around the plant, however Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said that the smoke there was nothing more than what might be found from a campfire—I don't know about you, but I've never known of a campfire that needed to have a a mile and a half exclusion zone around it. (15 of his deputies were also hospitalized for being around this "campfire.")

 Pictured here is the Chevron Phillips plant that has sent more than 766,000 pounds of chemicals to flare after the facility shut down following #hurricaneharvey. The plant was closed in anticipation of severe flooding. However, when the plant started up again it released massive amounts pollutants into the air including CO2, thus producing a vicious cycle when it comes to #climatechange: more CO2 in the atmosphere means warmer oceans which mean more powerful and drenching storms like #Harvey which then force plants like this one to shut down and then reopen.

This all strikes me as another reason why the energy that the US depends on MUST make a rapid transition to renewables. This is achievable if we made the effort and demand that the power we consume come from nonpolluting sources. The current administration under the 45th president has tried to block investment in clean energy. Indeed, the EPA whose responsibility it is to measure the impact from such disasters such as Harvey is being destroyed from within by the current president and his appointees as funding for the agency is being slashed. Presently, there is no director for the agency's Texas district.

#climatechangeisreal

 September 2, 2017  Update from earlier in the week: this is about a mile down the road from where I first posted-the fact that I could drive there and didn't have to take a boat is good news. But the waters are still high and neighborhood residents were using all manner of floating devices, from kayaks to inflatable couches, to make their way through the polluted water to their homes. And then there were moments of just silence with nobody around, birds walking around pecking at new sources of food in this new body of water.  I toned this picture in a nearby Panera over a cappuccino, leaving me feeling disconcerted as it was only a few miles away from the flooded neighborhood. But that's the reality here now. Some places remain underwater while others, sometimes just around the corner, are back to normal.....but nothing is back to normal: sitting just across from me was a man having a sandwich. A server came over to him with a receipt of some kind. Apparently he was angry about the transaction when he ordered: "You'll have to excuse me," said. His hands were shaky, "I just lost my house across the way and I'm a little bit on edge."

September 2, 2017

Update from earlier in the week: this is about a mile down the road from where I first posted-the fact that I could drive there and didn't have to take a boat is good news. But the waters are still high and neighborhood residents were using all manner of floating devices, from kayaks to inflatable couches, to make their way through the polluted water to their homes. And then there were moments of just silence with nobody around, birds walking around pecking at new sources of food in this new body of water.

I toned this picture in a nearby Panera over a cappuccino, leaving me feeling disconcerted as it was only a few miles away from the flooded neighborhood. But that's the reality here now. Some places remain underwater while others, sometimes just around the corner, are back to normal.....but nothing is back to normal: sitting just across from me was a man having a sandwich. A server came over to him with a receipt of some kind. Apparently he was angry about the transaction when he ordered: "You'll have to excuse me," said. His hands were shaky, "I just lost my house across the way and I'm a little bit on edge."

 September 3, 2017  From today's @everydayclimatechange post: We think of  #climatechange as an external thing seen from the outside, but when you really think about it, it invades into the internal structures of our lives too, tearing down walls, breaking the intimate rhythm of life at home. I was reminded of that when I saw this lovely old armoire tossed out onto the street in  #Dickenson ,  #Texas  with someone's clothing still hanging inside as if it had been moved from one room to another waiting to be put on. But of course now it will just fill the landfill, never to be worn again, a sad waste of a piece of loved clothing. (I say that with some projection as I love my sweaters and keep them for years, they become an extension of self, therefor seeing them in the street I can help but think that a part of the person who wore them is here too.) ——— The feeling in Dickenson is very different than what I experienced in  #houston . Houston is so spread out that there are times when you completely forget that anything happened. Neighborhoods there are as large as some cities like Dickenson. In a small place like this, then, there is a heightened sense of impact. Much of the community is poor (this photo was taken in a more middle class part of town, but this is also the town where the elder home was floooded), and in the poorer parts is likely to be forgotten and the existing needs of this community worsened by the flood. I think this is where filmmaking and photography come in: I don't have the illusion that I can make huge changes but in a small way it can call attention to the needs of the people here-if anything good can come from  #Harvey , it's that a community that wasn't seen before now is and I hope that some of those overlooked underlying needs can now be addressed. ...more to come from Dickenson in the coming days.....  #climatechangeisreal ,  #hurricane ,  #HurricaneHarvey

September 3, 2017

From today's @everydayclimatechange post: We think of #climatechangeas an external thing seen from the outside, but when you really think about it, it invades into the internal structures of our lives too, tearing down walls, breaking the intimate rhythm of life at home. I was reminded of that when I saw this lovely old armoire tossed out onto the street in #Dickenson#Texas with someone's clothing still hanging inside as if it had been moved from one room to another waiting to be put on. But of course now it will just fill the landfill, never to be worn again, a sad waste of a piece of loved clothing. (I say that with some projection as I love my sweaters and keep them for years, they become an extension of self, therefor seeing them in the street I can help but think that a part of the person who wore them is here too.) ———
The feeling in Dickenson is very different than what I experienced in #houston. Houston is so spread out that there are times when you completely forget that anything happened. Neighborhoods there are as large as some cities like Dickenson. In a small place like this, then, there is a heightened sense of impact. Much of the community is poor (this photo was taken in a more middle class part of town, but this is also the town where the elder home was floooded), and in the poorer parts is likely to be forgotten and the existing needs of this community worsened by the flood. I think this is where filmmaking and photography come in: I don't have the illusion that I can make huge changes but in a small way it can call attention to the needs of the people here-if anything good can come from #Harvey, it's that a community that wasn't seen before now is and I hope that some of those overlooked underlying needs can now be addressed. ...more to come from Dickenson in the coming days..... #climatechangeisreal#hurricane#HurricaneHarvey

 September 5  Houston update: When I came out I was thinking about children such as Lucia Domingo, 3 years old and the world that we are leaving for them as our legacy. I photographed her in one of Houston's poorest neighborhoods and therefor one of the most in need and most likely to be forgotten as the recovery begins here. (I am returning there this afternoon to begin a short film on the residents there.)  Lucia's father, not much more than a boy himself, still sleeps in their soggy apartment as the smell of mold and rot drift through the air. Many residents already have  #asthma  and this will no doubt add to their already fragile health.  Some in this community are undocumented and did not want to evacuate for fear of losing what little they already have. Others were simply just cut off from the world and do not know about the risks facing them as it applies to their health, thinking that the water will just go away and doing a little bit of cleaning will take care of things. Most units on the bottom floor of this complex already have black mold on the walls (it's toxic to breathe)—many residents who had those floor level apartments are now just moving upstairs. But what happens when the mold makes its way higher and gets into the general airflow? What abut the damaged structures themselves? I was surprised to see the mold on the walls so soon after the flood, but with temperatures so hot here I guess the mold grows quicker. All I know is that the mold is there and it's potent.   #Climatechange  is not just an atmospheric event, it is also societal because after the storm it produces a huge strain in communities. In  #Texas ' case, the clean up will cost billions and every American will have some some portion of their taxes go to help Texas get back on its feet. (And I'm all in for that and want to see Texas back to its proud self, however I have misgivings about the fact that this state's politicians do not believe their actions have a role in climate change, yet will continue making policy that adversely affects the entire planet.)  The coming together here in  #Houston  was truly remarkable. But as I've seen countless times in countless cities in the aftermath of climate change disasters the long term extremely difficult part of compensation begins and the poorer neighborhoods will, as always be the ones overlooked, another way how the climate bleeds into the social.  On another related, but separate note: As the 45th president of the United States considers to destroy  #DACA , a program that 800,000 vitally depend on to keep them engaged and contributing to this country, its dissolution threatens to further isolate immigrants into the corners of society. The result is that girls like Lucia will not have schooling or the ability to contribute to society, but become a drain on it because she has so few options.   #healing , #climatechange,  #climatechangeisreal ,  #globalwarming

September 5

Houston update: When I came out I was thinking about children such as Lucia Domingo, 3 years old and the world that we are leaving for them as our legacy. I photographed her in one of Houston's poorest neighborhoods and therefor one of the most in need and most likely to be forgotten as the recovery begins here. (I am returning there this afternoon to begin a short film on the residents there.)

Lucia's father, not much more than a boy himself, still sleeps in their soggy apartment as the smell of mold and rot drift through the air. Many residents already have #asthma and this will no doubt add to their already fragile health.

Some in this community are undocumented and did not want to evacuate for fear of losing what little they already have. Others were simply just cut off from the world and do not know about the risks facing them as it applies to their health, thinking that the water will just go away and doing a little bit of cleaning will take care of things. Most units on the bottom floor of this complex already have black mold on the walls (it's toxic to breathe)—many residents who had those floor level apartments are now just moving upstairs. But what happens when the mold makes its way higher and gets into the general airflow? What abut the damaged structures themselves? I was surprised to see the mold on the walls so soon after the flood, but with temperatures so hot here I guess the mold grows quicker. All I know is that the mold is there and it's potent.

#Climatechange is not just an atmospheric event, it is also societal because after the storm it produces a huge strain in communities. In #Texas' case, the clean up will cost billions and every American will have some some portion of their taxes go to help Texas get back on its feet. (And I'm all in for that and want to see Texas back to its proud self, however I have misgivings about the fact that this state's politicians do not believe their actions have a role in climate change, yet will continue making policy that adversely affects the entire planet.)

The coming together here in #Houston was truly remarkable. But as I've seen countless times in countless cities in the aftermath of climate change disasters the long term extremely difficult part of compensation begins and the poorer neighborhoods will, as always be the ones overlooked, another way how the climate bleeds into the social.

On another related, but separate note: As the 45th president of the United States considers to destroy #DACA, a program that 800,000 vitally depend on to keep them engaged and contributing to this country, its dissolution threatens to further isolate immigrants into the corners of society. The result is that girls like Lucia will not have schooling or the ability to contribute to society, but become a drain on it because she has so few options.

#healing, #climatechange, #climatechangeisreal#globalwarming

 September 6, 2017  Houston update: I’m sitting in the Houston Hobby airport reflecting on the past week, thinking about all that I have seen in  #Houston  and how this storm now overlaps with the lives of those  #Americans  who want to do the greatest of human activities and  #dream , but now might face deportation unless more humane laws are passed in this nation. In the waters and on the boats there were  #dreamers  who were saving lives and I have no doubt that those who lived because of their efforts are thankful for their help. Over the past week, I’ve met dreamers who own businesses and others who want to become architects so that they can help rebuild #Houston. In Houston, other dreamers are neurosurgeons, nurses, and grad students who then give back and strengthen this community and nation.———I hope that the progressive spirit that I've witnessed in Houston makes its way out into the rest of the country, to the world and especially to our politicians. If people here can bond together under the most adverse and dangerous circumstances I’d hope that the servants who were elected to manage this country can do the same and legislate in accordance with the true active  #compassion  witnessed here. (I make a point to say active because compassion requires that one does not merely say that’s what they are but show it in action and thus in legislation. All too often the body language that accompanies those elected who say they are compassionate is a shrug.)———.To end on the theme that I began on: the 2 girls here, neighbors, walk though the remnants of their community. As fires rage in Europe, storms drench the gulf and east coast and conflicts arise over water in Africa, there are millions more like them because of the changing climate that we are responsible for. I hope that we can turn things around and that begins with advocating for more forward thinking energy policy and choices—and that choice also entails personal choice and, yes, sacrifice because some of the alternatives are a little more expensive and take effort to seek out. But there is no alternative.  #dreamers,  #heal ,  #harvey   #hurricaneharvey ,  #climatechange ,  #climatechangeisreal ,  #hurricaneirma   #irma

September 6, 2017

Houston update: I’m sitting in the Houston Hobby airport reflecting on the past week, thinking about all that I have seen in #Houston and how this storm now overlaps with the lives of those #Americans who want to do the greatest of human activities and #dream, but now might face deportation unless more humane laws are passed in this nation. In the waters and on the boats there were #dreamers who were saving lives and I have no doubt that those who lived because of their efforts are thankful for their help. Over the past week, I’ve met dreamers who own businesses and others who want to become architects so that they can help rebuild #Houston. In Houston, other dreamers are neurosurgeons, nurses, and grad students who then give back and strengthen this community and nation.———I hope that the progressive spirit that I've witnessed in Houston makes its way out into the rest of the country, to the world and especially to our politicians. If people here can bond together under the most adverse and dangerous circumstances I’d hope that the servants who were elected to manage this country can do the same and legislate in accordance with the true active #compassion witnessed here. (I make a point to say active because compassion requires that one does not merely say that’s what they are but show it in action and thus in legislation. All too often the body language that accompanies those elected who say they are compassionate is a shrug.)———.To end on the theme that I began on: the 2 girls here, neighbors, walk though the remnants of their community. As fires rage in Europe, storms drench the gulf and east coast and conflicts arise over water in Africa, there are millions more like them because of the changing climate that we are responsible for. I hope that we can turn things around and that begins with advocating for more forward thinking energy policy and choices—and that choice also entails personal choice and, yes, sacrifice because some of the alternatives are a little more expensive and take effort to seek out. But there is no alternative.

#dreamers, #heal#harvey #hurricaneharvey#climatechange#climatechangeisreal#hurricaneirma #irma

 September 11, 2017 I feel fortunate to have contributed photographs to  this poignant story  for the @NYT. My thoughts go out to writer Clifford Krauss as he and his family rebuild their lives following the storm.

September 11, 2017 I feel fortunate to have contributed photographs to this poignant story for the @NYT. My thoughts go out to writer Clifford Krauss as he and his family rebuild their lives following the storm.

September 10, 2017 I woke up this morning thinking about the battered Gulf Coast and the massive restoration efforts that will be needed in the coming years.

Last year I worked on a project along Louisiana's coast that looked at the legacy of the BP oil spill. After they were fined for gross negligence one of the things BP had to help rebuild were the barrier islands off of the LA cost. Those islands, however, were already battered by hurricanes and rising sea levels—and they are essential for helping decrease the force of hurricanes as they approach the coast. (Their land mass acts as a kind of speed bump sapping the hurricane of the warm waters it uses as fuel.)

Sadly, such projects are now threatened by the 45th president and yet the communities that benefit from the barrier islands are key voting blocks of the president's.

These restoration projects are also some the the largest employers in the state and protect the land for hunters and preservationists alike. I hope that these projects will continue the be advocated for—both by us in other states, but especially by the people in Louisiana who might not be perceived as giving consideration to the environment, but know full well that unless the rising tide can be stemmed, their children and their communities will have no future on the land that some have called theirs for generations.

Jake Price